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Lascar & Villarrica Volcanoes

Lizzette Rodriguez

As part of my Ph.D. research, titled “SO2 loss rates at volcanoes with different atmospheric conditions”, I took the mini-DOAS to Chile on October 2002. We made SO2 emission rate measurements at Lascar and Villarrica, two of Chile’s most active volcanoes, during a period of two months; these being the first DOAS measurements ever made at these volcanoes. Collaborations with groups in Argentina (Instituto Geonorte - Universidad Nacional de Salta) were continued and those with the groups in Chile (Universidad Catolica del Norte and the Observatorio Volcanologico de los Andes del Sur - OVDAS) and Italy (Universita degli Studi di Firenze) were started. As a result of these collaborations, we are planning for another field campaign in the next year and OVDAS has expressed their interest in the installation of at least two DOAS sites to monitor the activity of Villarrica volcano. In addition to going back to Chile for another field season, I will use the mini-DOAS to measure SO2 loss rates at the Sourfriere Hills volcano, Montserrat and probably at Pacaya, Santa Ana, and Masaya volcanoes, in Central America, as well as Etna volcano, Sicily.

 

Mini-DOAS during measurements at Villarrica Volcano, Chile, from the west flank (Rio Voipir Seco).

 

 

 

 

Amazing shot of the mini-DOAS and the plume at Villarrica volcano, on Dec 12, 2002

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mini-DOAS setup at Villarrica Volcano, near the glacier (southeast side)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

View of Lascar Volcano and its plume from the N-NW. From left to right: Aguas Calientes, Lascar, and Corona. Llamas are very common in the Atacama Desert.

 

 

 

 

Lava flow and pumice flow deposits produced by Lascar eruptions (N-NW flank).

 

 


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http://www.geo.mtu.edu/volcanoes/vc_web/tools/index.html -- Revised: 10 April 2003
Copyright 2002 MTU Department of Geological Engineering and Sciences. All Rights Reserved.
Email questions about the content of this Web page to: Yvonne Branan, Lizzette Rodriguez, Alex Matiella or Matt Watson